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   A leading indicator of Eureka County's economic stability is the taxable sales figures since 1996 as compiled by the Nevada Department of Taxation. When these are reviewed it is apparent that there was a 25.7 percent drop in sales from 1996-97 to 1998-99 which coincides with the downturn in the mining industry at the time. Since 1998-99 through 2000-01, there has been a modest increase of 3.8 percent in taxable sales figures.

Selected Tax Rates and Taxable Sales
Sales Tax: 6.5%
Taxable Sales
    1996-97  $239,951,161
    1997-98  $222,728,984
    1998-99  $178,190,772
    1999-00  $180,454,034
    2000-01  $184,929,752
Sources: Eureka County, Eureka County Assisted Living Facility Feasibility; Nevada Department of Taxation
http://tax.state.nv.us/



Public Finance
   The costs of operating government and schools in Eureka County are paid for through a variety of taxes and fees, collected either at the State level (for distribution to the County) or at the County level. Taxes and fees collected by the County, and by the State of Nevada for distribution to the County, include:
  • Cigarette and other tobacco products excise tax: set at 10 cents per package of 20 cigarettes, less an administrative fee, deposited in the local government tax distribution fund and redistributed within each county by statutory formula;

  • City-county gaming tax: levied on the retail sale of tangible personal property for use of consumption, plus equipment leases and rentals, including the State sales and use tax (SST), the local school support tax (LSST), the basic city county relief tax (BCCRT), the supplemental city county relief tax (SCCRT), and county optional sales taxes, and distributed to the State general fund, school districts and local governments;

  • County gaming fees: charged on card games, other games and slots at $25, $50, and $10 per month respectively, to the county general fund, from which a portion is distributed to cities and unincorporated towns;

  • County motor vehicle fuel tax: set at 1 cent per gallon, used only for repair and restoration of existing paved roads and streets owned by the County;

  • County RTC motor vehicle fuel tax: set, in Eureka County, at 4 cents per gallon of motor vehicle fuel sold, to the regional highway fund for construction or improvements;

  • Intoxicating liquor tax: liquor over 22 percent alcohol is taxed at $2.05 per gallon, of which 50 cents is deposited in the local government tax distribution fund and redistributed within each county by statutory formula;

  • Local franchise fee: imposed by ordinance on public utilities, including local governments, that provide electrical energy, natural gas, or telecommunications; collected from utility customers; limited to a maximum of 5 percent of the utility's gross revenue;

  • Local transient lodging tax: levied in Eureka County at 8 percent on revenues form the rental of transient lodging;

  • Motor vehicle privilege tax, basic: a tax of 4 or 5 cents on each $1 valuation of a vehicle, plus taxes on trailers and other vehicles, distributed to the state highway fund, schools, and the local government tax distribution fund for distribution by statutory formula;

  • Net proceeds of minerals and patented mines tax: received by counties, cities, towns, school districts, and special districts based on their tax rate times net proceeds; covers both real property of patented mines and proceeds of patented and unpatented mines; includes royalties; set at a rate between 2 and 5 percent, depending on the ratio of net proceeds to gross proceeds;

  • Personal property tax: on business personal property, mobile and manufactured homes not converted to real property, leasehold improvements, and non-licensed vehicles, at the same rate and distributed in the same manner as taxes on real property;

  • Real property (ad valorem) tax: set at a rate per $100 of assessed valuation, to a statutory maximum of $3.64, including a state rate of 15 cents, a school operating rate of 75 cents, and a variable school debt rate, and distributed to the State, cities, towns, counties, school districts, general improvement districts, and special districts;

  • Real property transfer tax: levied on the value of real property transferred from one person to another, at 65 cents per $500 of value, of which 55 cents goes to the local government tax distribution fund for redistribution by statutory formula;

  • Slot machine excise tax: a statewide annual tax of $250 per machine, a portion of which goes to the State Distributive School Fund;

  • State games license, annual fees: an annual fee on all games, distributed among the 17 counties, less the cost of administration, to the county general fund;

  • State motor vehicle fuel tax: set at 23 cents per gallon, of which 5.35 cents is distributed to county road funds;

  • State transient lodging tax: 8 percent, levied by the State on revenues from rental of transient housing, in addition to any locally-imposed room tax, and distributed to counties or fair and recreation boards for the promotion of tourism or to furnish recreation facilities; and

  • Miscellaneous local levies.
   For Fiscal Year 2001, Eureka County collected $11.7 million and expended $8.5 million. The two largest revenue sources were property taxes including net proceeds of mines and intergovernmental receipts. The projected budget for FY 2002 is smaller, with the County expecting to receive $9.7 million and expend $8.4 million. The volatility in Eureka County's budget is largely due to fluctuations in mining activity.

Note: The Eureka County School District is a separate unit of government, with a separate budget.

Source: Eureka County, Impact Assessment Report on Proposed Shipments of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste through Eureka County, Nevada -- and the Nevada Taxpayers Association.



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